World Wine Reality Check

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This just in from Vinepair.com, The 25 Best Rose Wines of 2021.
https://vinepair.com/buy-this-booze/25-best-rose-wines-2020

I read this one in the middle of the night when I couldn’t sleep. Big mistake. It just got me all fired up about the egregious disparities between the US and the rest of the world. Again.

12 of the “best” rosés in this lineup are American. Of those 12, 11 are from California. Biased? I am thinking so.
Then there is the subject of price. “…over half of the bottles here clock in at under $25…making them great case-buys.” Lol. Sounds expensive to me. Maybe that is because here in Portugal I can buy fabulous rosés for about $2-5 per bottle. If I want to seriously splurge, I can drop 24 euros on an outstanding single varietal Touriga Nacional rosé. I am sure it would compare favorably with the $40 Provence rosé they peg at number four on the list. In fact, I know that I would prefer the Portuguese rosé because I have had the Domaines Ott rosé. And while it is good, it is not worth $40 a bottle in my book. The Pacheca reserva rosé is more complex and satisfying in my estimation. And admittedly, in this case, I am biased.

Pacheca Reserva Rosé. Magically delicious!

So why are wines so much more expensive in the states?
Well, because of the three-tier system, a throwback to prohibition, prices are disproportionately jacked up. There is talk of revamping this auto-overpricing system. But given America’s Puritanical, capitalistic roots, I would be surprised if that actually happens.
(Just like the health insurance system, to name one of the many broken systems in the US. But I digress.)
Reading the Vinepair article, I am reminded of how oblivious people in the US are. Hell, I was one of them until about five years ago.
Back in the day, we all thought that America was the greatest country in the world. And maybe back then, it was. Sadly, not anymore. When I mention how scary and dangerous it is over there, my friends say it is not that bad. Really? When a person can be shot and killed going to the grocery store on any given day, I have to say, yes, it is. The shooting du jour has become shootings du jour. And that is the tip of the iceberg, I am afraid. But again, I digress.

To further illustrate my point, here is an article about affordable rosés that appeared in the Irish Sun.
https://www.thesun.ie/fabulous/6994586/10-presentable-bottles-rose-enjoy-ireland/
It is titled, On the Grapevine. 10 of the best perfectly presentable and very affordable bottles of Rosé wine for you to enjoy.
They run from about 6.50 to 25 euros, with one from Italy for 40 euros. And, I should point out that the 40 euro number is different because of the winemaking process and is aged for a year. That might justify the higher price. (Not just another overpriced French rosé.)
Now, Ireland is an island and, these wines all have to be shipped over. So the fact that they are so much cheaper than their American cousins, for the most part, underscores my point. Most of them are 7-12 euros. This sounds like a much better case-buy to me.

The Palmelão pictured below is a great every day rosé for about $2. I am sure that it would compare favorably to most of the $15 rosés that are available in the US. And it is not Franzia-like leftovers. It is a well crafted three-varietal rosé. For about two dollars a bottle. (Eat your heart out two buck Chuck!)

Two outstanding Rosés from Portugal. The Palmelão is from the Pamela region of Setubal, in the south. The Pacheca is from the Douro in the north.

Having spent years in the booze biz in the states, I have tasted a lot of wines. And while I can appreciate a good Provence rosé, now that I have had some of the Portuguese rosés for a fraction of the price, I can never go back. Never mind the wildly overpriced California offerings. (Sorry, Ca. And, I am from the Golden state.) Why would I want to?
And, I guess if you live in the United States, it helps to be oblivious to these kinds of disparities.

And Now This…

Portuguese wine and spirits.  Because, I love me some wine and spirits!

Wine is a deep subject. There is no end to it once you start to study it. American wines are probably the most straightforward, but that doesn’t mean they are easy by any means. Then there are French wines, Italian, German and Austrian, and Portuguese, to name a few. Each one is a study in itself and, the approachability descends with each country listed!

I have been a student of wine and spirits for over ten years, and the learning curve continues to challenge me. So, in an attempt to educate myself and hopefully shed some light on the subject, I am going to write here about Portuguese wines and the derivatives thereof.
It would be a waste not to strive for expertise in the subject when I have the supreme good fortune to be living in Portugal! So, here goes!  Bring on the Vinhos Portugueses!(See previous post, Got Wine?)

Check out this little number! Pacheca Rosé Reserva. Now that the weather has started to heat up, it’s rosé all-day season! It is an herbaceous and complex rose made up of 100% Touriga Nacional, the premier grape of Portugal. With brambly red and black fruit flavors, it is outstanding, refreshing, and goes with just about anything. Think of it as the little black dress of wine!  Saúde!

Força Portugal!

The courtyard at Quinta da Pacheca.

We are heading into week number 4 of lockdown here in Portugal and, I have to say that it hasn’t been too bad. The lines to get into the stores have been minimal. There has not been a shortage of much of anything so far. I am happy to report that there is plenty of TP, food, and drink.
It is a far cry from the pandemonium we are hearing coming from our friends in Italy, Spain, and the US. We wish you all well. So sorry that you are the victims of so much trumpery. (Yup, it’s a word. Go ahead, look it up.)

Kudos to the Portuguese government for handling the crisis so well thus far. Thanks to the quick official response, and cooperation of the people, it looks like the virus will be contained here sooner rather than later. We hope so. In any case, it is being taken a lot more seriously than in a lot of countries.

Springtime in a glass!

There have even been some perks. One of our favorite wineries, Quinta da Pacheca, has been offering 20% off their wines with free delivery on a case or more. We now have plenty of wine. More and more restaurants are offering take-out and delivery. That includes our favorite pizza place, Rei da Gula, here in Gaia. So, theoretically, we wouldn’t have to leave the house at all except to walk the dog. The mandate is to, “Fique em casa.” Stay home, which we are doing. We hope that you are too. Lay low and know that better times are coming. Stay strong and stay well, everyone.

The Douro Valley, Part One.

I was glad that our things arrived when they did as I was thinking of taking a trip to the Douro valley wine country before the tourist season got underway and the weather got too hot to handle.  I picked up a book on Enotourism in Portugal that runs down the best Quintas (wineries) in every region.  There are 12 wine regions in Portugal, including the island of Madeira.  (Pretty much all of Portugal is a wine region!)  Guia de Enoturismo Portugal, O que provar, O que visitar by Maria João de Almeida:  Enotourism guide to Portugal, where to try and where to visit.  It is a handy reference for visiting wineries in Portugal.  Good thing I’m making headway with my Portuguese because I did not find it in English!  Luckily, it’s pretty easy reading.

I spent some time poring over the Douro section and picked an assortment of wineries that sounded the most interesting.  One can take a day trip to the Douro on a boat or by train, but we decided to rent a car and drive.  It is impossible to realize the scope of the area in only one day, especially when it takes 1.5-2 hours to get there from Porto.  I could spend a month in the Douro valley, but we chose to do three days, two wineries per day.  Sounds reasonable, right?

Our first mistake was bringing Jiver, our dog.  I thought, we have some doggie downers, and it’s only an hour and a half away.  Ha, ha, ha.  Remember that flight from Denver to Porto?  Oh, yeah, enter the incredible shaking, panting, and whining dog.  Ok, it was a bad idea.  Oh, and shedding machine of a dog too.  Of course, our not so smart rental car had a black interior.  Nice.  After half an hour, it had a white dog hair interior!  The only thing worse than Jiver was my husband Joe, who is also a nervous traveler and a back-seat driver.  Ugh.  Again, good thing it was a short road trip!

Google wasn’t much help either.  While the car’s GPS system got us out of Porto, it quit about 20 minutes into the trip.  And, what is it with the use of coordinates to find a place?  We missed the turn off to Villa Real, which takes you to Peso de Régua, our first stop, which cost us about 20 minutes.  When we finally arrived, we used the coordinates given to find our Airbnb.  Joe punched it in with one wrong number, and we drove all over hell and gone before we ended up back where we started!  The Airbnb was right in the center of town!  Damn!  So now, we are late for our first winery tour.  Raios!

Airbnb.Regua
The view from our Airbnb in Peso de Regua with terraced vineyards and the Douro river.

Regua.Wine.City
Peso Da Regua: City of Wine!

Here is an important safety tip:  You must make an appointment to visit Quintas in Portugal.  DO NOT just show up at a winery and expect to take a tour.  These places are small and muito popular!  This is one of the first things the Guide tells you.  (Thank you, Maria!)  Our original plan was to leave Jiver at the Airbnb.  But since we were running so late, we just brought him with us.  Even as a service dog in uniform, he is not allowed in a lot of places.  Portugal is not super dog friendly, sadly.

Pacheca.2
Sitting area and vineyards at Quinta da Pacheca.

We arrived at Quinta da Pacheca half an hour late and were told, no dogs at first.  Then, they told us to go ahead up to the winery, and they let us join the group with Jiver after all.  Whew, it was stressful getting there, but once we settled down, it was beautiful!  Jiver made friends instantly with Aqua, the winery dog, and it was all good.  (She was cute, and hey, Jiver is a handsome guy!)

Barrel.rooms.Pacheca
Wine barrel rooms in the vineyard at Quinta da Pacheca.

Quinta da Pacheca, besides being a fantastically beautiful winery with wonderful wines, has wine barrel rooms where guests can stay!  That’s right folks, for $3-$400 per night, you can stay in a giant wine barrel that has been converted into a room on the property.  While they looked cool, it was a little out of our price range.  We cheaped out on accommodations so that we could buy more wine to take home!  The wines at Pacheca were so good that we bought a mixed case of red and white wines and port.  Hey, they had free shipping within Portugal and, as Joe likes to say, why wouldn’t you?  Keep calm and drink wine.  That’s our motto!