New World Order

How about that Covid-19 virus?! 

This means you!

Here’s some of what I’ve been reading in the news from the states:  38% of Americans are avoiding Corona Mexican beer because of the name!  Also, people are avoiding Chinese food because of the connection between the virus and its country of origin.  WOW! 

Some of the things I’ve been seeing online have only reinforced the contention that the level of stupidity has gone off the charts stateside.  Here are a couple more headlines out there right now: Why America’s Virus Response Looks Like a Patchwork, this from the New York Times, mind you.  Well, Captain Obvious, could it be that America is a patchwork of states that all have different rules?  And if you don’t know this you might want to go back and study your American history.  Just saying. 

Also, Infected People Without Symptoms Might be Driving the Spread of the Corona Virus.  This one from CNN.  Yup, you heard right.  Now, I am not a science type by any stretch of the imagination but, if I was a betting person, I would bet big that people who are infected and not showing symptoms are driving the spread of this new virus. 

Think about your basic cold viruses, just from personal experience I know that when I start coming down with a common cold, I am in denial about it.  Oh, I’m just tired…   Meanwhile, I’m out and about probably infecting every other person with which I come into contact.  I guess only time will tell if this is the case and the big CV is transmitted in a similar manner. 

In the meantime, people are reacting like the dumb, panicky, dangerous animals that they are, buying out basics at the grocery store so that people who might really need said basics can’t get them.  Amazing and sad but true to form, people are reacting with a panicked herd mentality. 

Important Safety Tip!

But enough of CV-19 and the blatant stupidity that is a rampant contagion worse than the virus.  It is funny how ahead of the curve we are, already working from home.  We’ve been home workers for over a year now and have become used to our own company for the most part.  We still have to walk the dog but now taking walks is our main form of entertainment outside of the house.  It’s not so bad really.  It helps if you have a hermit kind of mentality to begin with, I guess, which I do. 

Wisteria Blooming in Canidelo, Vila Nova de Gaia.

It is almost spring and all of the trees are blooming here in the Porto area and the air is redolent of the white Jasmine that grows in the area.  Nature says, silly humans, life goes on.  And so should we, albeit with the utmost caution. Stay well everyone!

Portugal, what a country!

It is great to be here! We still wake up every day and pinch ourselves that it’s true, we live in Portugal! The summer was wonderful; the weather couldn’t have been better, mid 70’s to low 80’s. Now, I’m told that this was a very unusual summer and that it is usually much warmer. And to that I say, thanks universe, and hope that cooler summers will be a trend. 

And, of course, the food has been fan-freakin’-tastic everywhere we have gone. The same goes for the wines. I used to be such a wine snob. In the US I would look at the wine list and sometimes not even have wine if there wasn’t anything that looked good on it. Here, the house wine is fine! They are nearly all good if not excellent. 

As for the Portuguese bureaucracy, we have been extremely lucky. At our visa renewal appointment, we only had to wait about 15 minutes and when we went to finanças (Portuguese IRS) to register after getting our resident visa cards, we waited five minutes tops. Incrível! So far, so good. 

The DMV (IMT in Portugal) was another matter. You have three months after you get your resident card to turn in your foreign driver’s license for a Portuguese drivers’ license. (Although, I have been reading that that is about to change, and it will soon be three years before you must get a Portuguese license.)  If you make the three-month deadline it only costs 30 Euros. If not, it costs 60 Euros and you must take a driver’s test. (Ugh!) Before you can go to the IMT and get your new driver’s license, you must register with the Centro de Saude, (national health system) and get a certificate of health. You must also get a certified copy of your driving record to prove the validity of your current driver’s license.  Three months, no problem.  Right. 

After wrangling with the Colorado DMV and the USPS for a month, we received the certified copies of our driving records by registered mail.  At this point, we now had 10 days before the deadline to turn in our US licenses.  It cost $64 and change to mail four pieces of paper to arrive in Portugal within a week.  International logistics are still costly and time-consuming. 

It took three trips to various Centros de Saude and a trip to the wrong IMT office before we made it to the right office and spent the afternoon waiting for our numbers to be called. (It reminded me of the afterlife waiting room scene in the movie Beetlejuice.)  Happily, though we spent the day from 9-5 between the health office and the IMT offices, we made it on the last day of the deadline! Whew! Got ‘er done! I guess long waits at the DMV are universal.  

Now, theoretically, we should be Portuguese bureaucracy home free until next June when we will have to renew our resident visas again.  It has certainly been an adventure! 

Coming soon: The Last of our Stuff, and Festival Season!

So, we just figured out that the last two boxes that we shipped from Denver should arrive soon!  They cleared customs about a week ago.  These were the things we forgot to pack up and send with the movers: a framed botanical print (heirloom) and some miscellaneous kitchen things that we had to have.  We should have just left them, but noooo…that would’ve been too easy!  Hopefully, they will arrive soon.

Meanwhile, Portugal has officially entered festival season!  P-A-R-T-Y, because we gotta!  The Porto Beer festival kicked it off for us.  Craft beer in Portugal is just getting started which is awesome!  As much of a wino as I am, it is great to have a good beer occasionally.

PBF.Signage
Porto International Craft Beer Festival Sign.

The Porto beer fest is the biggest artisanal beer festival in Europe with 47 breweries and 368 beers to try and, they do it right here!  It runs over four days and there are lots of food trucks to choose from for having a good nosh to pair with the beers.  You pay 4 Euros for a glass and purchase tokens for beer samples.  You can come and go as you please over the four days.

This eliminates the insanity that we see at the GABF:  Huge mobs of drunken hooligans in Denver for three days trying to sample 3,000 beers in one day because the tickets are so expensive ($70-85) with no real food.  The Great American Beer Festival was fun 15-20 years ago before it became such a behemoth scene.  It’s so American; take everything to the extreme and charge as much as possible.

We had some great brews from Portugal, Spain, Estonia and the Netherlands, to name a few.  There were even a couple from the US, Sierra Nevada and Kona Brewing.  There was also a nice Spanish whiskey and coffee liquor to sample from Yria out of Madrid.  Their beers were great as well and they had a delicious mead made with cherries.  Yum!

PBF.Beers
Porto Beer Fest Beers for purchase.

For food there were delicious empanadas, prosciutto like ham and Serra Estrela Portuguese cheese sandwiches which were outstanding, several different kinds of burger trucks, crepes, sweet and savory and a tasty doughnut like cake from the Algarve that was dangerously delicious.  There were even several vegetarian offerings.  Yes, all in all the event was a taste treat sensation.

On June 23rd, we will have the festival of São João here in Porto, which is a BIG deal, I’ve heard.  Can’t wait.  It is the official start of the grilled sardine season, one of my favorites.  And don’t even say ew until you’ve had one here.  They are delicious and nothing like the sad fishy things you get in the states.  (Even though I liked those too!)

Stay tuned!

The Douro Valley, Part Three.

Tile work at the train station in Pinao.

We visited two more wineries in Pinhão while we were there:  Quinta de la Rosa and Quinta do Seixo.  One would think that it would get old touring port wineries but, they were all quite unique.  Pacheca, while a rather large operation, was spacious with lovely grounds and a wide selection of wines.  Quinta do Pôpa was a small boutique wine house that sat high above the Douro river and gave individual tastings from the terrace overlooking the water below.  (They were doing renovations, so tours were not available at the time.)  You could also order a picnic basket lunch to have with your wine tasting, which looked great!  (We had a cheese plate that was perfect with the wines.)

Quinta do Monte Bravo was the smallest and most endearing with unequalled personal hospitality as well as being the perfect place to get away from it all at the same time.  The food and wines were fabulous, and we felt like we were staying with friends.  It was an unparalleled experience which we can’t recommend enough.  geral@quintadojontebravo.pt.

The vineyards at Quinta do Monte Bravo.

Quinta de la Rosa was medium sized and, like Pôpa, offered panoramic views of the river.  It also had rooms and an excellent restaurant as well as an informative tour.  They also make beer at Quinta de la Rosa; a lager, an IPA and a stout, all of which were as delicious as the wines and ports.

Quinta do Seixo was the largest operation we saw and is owned by Sogrape which is a huge port wine conglomerate that also owns Sandeman, one of the biggest port houses that has holdings in Spain where they make sherry as well.  The Sandeman brand image is an international icon of port wine.  He is a silhouette of a man with a Spanish hat and Portuguese cape to symbolize both countries that was created in 1928.

Quinta do Seixo is a state-of-the-art port winery that gives a fun and informative tour.  The tour guide wore a hat and cape and made sure that everyone had a good time while learning about the process of making port wine.  There was wine tasting at each winery and Seixo was the only one that only offered port wines.  (That is one of the great aspects of visiting the Douro valley; most of the wineries make great table wines as well as port so, if sweet wines aren’t your thing, the dry wines are delicious as well.) They did, however, have a bar where you could have port cocktails after the tour which was awesome!  Porto tonico, anyone?

Porto e tonico (dry white port and tonic water) is our new favorite cocktail and we have one or two almost every evening to celebrate the fim do dia.  Try it and you’ll be hooked, at least for the summer!

In all, we made it to five wineries in three days and had an incredible time.  The Guia de Enoturismo lists 16 top wineries in the Douro valley so we will be returning for more sometime soon!

Festival Season!

Portugal has officially entered festival season!  P-A-R-T-Y, because we gotta!  The Porto International Craft Beer Festival kicked it off for us.  Craft beer in Portugal is just starting to take off which is great for veteran beer geeks like ourselves.  As much as wine is usually my first drink of choice, it is great to have a good beer occasionally. And when I say a good beer, I don’t mean some fruit flavored concoction the likes of which are so popular in the states right now.

The Porto beer fest is the biggest artisanal beer festival in Europe with 47 breweries and 368 beers to try and, they do it right here!  It runs over four days and there are lots of food trucks to choose from for having a good nosh to pair with the beers.  You pay 4 Euros for a glass and purchase tokens for beer samples.  You can come and go as you please over the four days. 

This eliminates the insanity that is seen at the GABF:  Huge mobs of drunken hooligans in Denver for three days trying to sample 3,000 beers in one day because the tickets are so expensive ($70-85) with no real food.  The Great American Beer Festival was fun 15-20 years ago before it became such a behemoth scene.  It’s so American; take everything to the extreme and charge as much as possible.

We tried some excellent brews from Portugal, Spain, Estonia and the Netherlands, to name a few.  There were even a couple from the US, Sierra Nevada and Kona Brewing.  There was also a nice Spanish whiskey and coffee liquor to sample from Yria out of Madrid, Spain.  Their beers were great as well and they had a delicious mead made with cherries.   

Yria Whiskey and Coffee Liquor

For food there were delicious empanadas, prosciutto like ham and Serra Estrela Portuguese cheese sandwiches which were outstanding, several different kinds of burger trucks, crepes, sweet and savory and a tasty doughnut like cake from the Algarve that was dangerously delicious.  There were even several vegetarian offerings.  Yes, all in all the event was a taste treat sensation. We will certainly plan to attend the Porto beer fest again next year!

The Douro Valley, Part Two.

After a hapless day of travelling (just call us “wrong way”), we took Jiver back to the Airbnb and went out to seek internal nourishment.  We had a couple of recommendations for places to eat from a local friend in Porto and found Taberna do Jéréré to be close by and by some miracle, Google actually got us there!  Holy mother of wow!  I had the chef’s seafood special and Joe had a veal steak.  (Roast, more like!  Well, look!)  While the seafood dish was like a baked seafood surprise it was dee-licious!  Crab, shrimp and cod all baked with mashed potatoes, and vegetables in a sort of cream sauce.  Waugh!  It was all crazy good.  And chocolate Charlotte cake for dessert.   All for about 40 Euros for two with apps and wine!

After dinner we strolled back to our place and found that Jiver had eaten the entire bag of doggie downer treats!  OMG, the bag said one per day per 20 kg. of dog!  Well, we hoped they wouldn’t kill him!  The fact that they didn’t and only gave him horrendous gas tells how useless they really were!  He was fine and ready to whine the next day!

From Régua, we drove to Quinta do Pôpa, a dog friendly winery way up on a hill overlooking the river that had the most fantastic view as well as wines and port.  Quinta do Pôpa is a small winery on the way to Pinhão that has the most user-friendly website of all the wineries I looked at.  I signed us up for our visit and ordered a cheese plate for us to have while doing our tasting without having to make a phone call.  The staff was awesome as were the wines.  They asked us if they could take a picture of us with Jiver to use online to show that dogs are welcome and we said, of course.  C’mon Portugal, more places like this, please!

Quinta Do Monte Bravo signage, a few kilometers outside of Pinhao in the Douro Valley.

After a wonderful time at Quinta do Pôpa we drove toward Pinhão and our next stop, which was Quinta do Monte Bravo, a working winery that doubles as an Airbnb.  Several times we asked ourselves, is this right?!  The road was so full of turns and so deserted.  At one point we drove across what looked like someone’s driveway!  Finally, we saw the sign on the winery.  This place is way off the beaten path but is so beautiful and tranquil that it was worth the effort to get there.  Teresa greeted us and took us to our room which was lovely and spacious for an Airbnb.  The only sounds were of chirping birds.  Now, this is a vineyard retreat in the heart of the Douro valley!

Azuelos tile depiction of a vineyard on the Torto River in the city of Pinhao.

We were supposed to go to another winery that afternoon but decided to stay at Monte Bravo and walk the vineyards instead.  We were there for two nights and had dinner on site in a building where they feed the workers during harvest.  It was amazing!  Teresa cooked for us and her husband Pedro, the proprietor joined us for some pleasant conversation which was a mix of English and Portuguese.  The food and wines were outstanding.  Suffice it to say, that a good time was had by all!

The Douro Valley, Part One.

I was glad that our things arrived when they did as I was thinking of taking a trip to the Douro valley wine country before the tourist season got underway and the weather got too hot to handle.  I picked up a book on Enotourism in Portugal that runs down the best Quintas (wineries) in every region.  There are 12 wine regions in Portugal including the island of Madeira.  (Pretty much all of Portugal is a wine region!)  Guia de Enoturismo Portugal, O que provar, O que visitar by Maria João de Almeida:  Enotourism guide to Portugal, where to try and where to visit.  It is a great reference for visiting wineries in Portugal.  Good thing I’m making headway with my Portuguese because I did not find it in English!  Luckily, it’s pretty easy reading.

I spent some time poring over the Douro section and picked an assortment of wineries that sounded the most interesting.  One can do a day trip to the Douro on a boat or by train but that is for amateurs!  It is impossible to realize the scope of the area in only one day, especially when it takes 1.5-2 hours to get there from Porto.  I could spend a month in the Douro valley, but we chose to do three days, two wineries per day.  Sounds reasonable, right?

Our first mistake was bringing Jiver, our dog.  I thought, we have some doggie downers, and it’s only an hour and a half away.  Ha, ha, ha.  Remember that flight from Denver to Porto?  Oh, yeah enter the incredible shaking, panting and whining dog.  Ok, it was a bad idea.  Oh, and shedding machine of a dog too.  Of course, our not so smart rental car had a black interior.  Nice.  After half an hour it had a white dog hair interior!  The only thing worse than Jiver was my husband Joe who is also a nervous traveler and a back-seat driver.  Ugh.  Again, good thing it was a short road trip!

Google wasn’t much help either.  While the car’s GPS system got us out of Porto, it quit about 20 minutes into the trip.  And, what is it with the use of coordinates to find a place?  We missed the turn off to Villa Real which takes you to Peso de Régua, our first stop, and that cost us about 20 minutes.  When we finally arrived, we used the coordinates given to find our Airbnb.  Joe punched it in with one wrong number and we drove all over hell and gone before we ended up back where we started!  The Airbnb was right in the center of town!  Damn!  So now, we are late for our first winery tour.  Raios!

Airbnb.Regua
The view from our Airbnb in Peso de Regua with terraced vineyards and the Douro river.

 

 

Regua.Wine.City
Peso Da Regua: City of Wine!

Here is an important safety tip:  You must make an appointment to visit Quintas in Portugal.  DO NOT just show up at a winery and expect to take a tour.  These places are small and muito popular!  This is one of the first things the Guide tells you.  (Thank you, Maria!)  Our original plan was to leave Jiver at the Airbnb but since we were running so late, we just brought him with us.  Even as a service dog in uniform, he is not allowed in a lot of places.  Portugal is not super dog friendly, sadly.

Pacheca.2
Sitting area and vineyards at Quinta da Pacheca.

We arrived at Quinta da Pacheca half an hour late and were told, no dogs at first.  Then, they told us to go ahead up to the winery and they let us join the group with Jiver after all.  Whew, it was stressful getting there but once we settled down, it was beautiful!  Jiver made friends instantly with Aqua the winery dog and it was all good.  (She was cute and hey, Jiver is a handsome guy!)

Barrel.rooms.Pacheca
Wine barrel rooms in the vineyard at Quinta da Pacheca.

Quinta da Pacheca, besides being a fantastically beautiful winery with wonderful wines, has wine barrel rooms where guests can stay!  That’s right folks, for $3-$400 per night you can stay in a giant wine barrel that’s been converted into a room on the property.  While they looked cool, it was a little out of our price range.  We cheaped out on accommodations so that we could buy more wine to take home!  The wines at Pacheca were so good that we bought a mixed case of red and white wines and port.  Hey, they had free shipping within Portugal and, as Joe likes to say, why wouldn’t you?  Keep calm and drink wine.  That’s our motto!

 

Y’all Ready for This?!

Random is the keyword for how things work here in Portugal.  I have been told by locals that how things go in the government offices largely depends upon the mood of the employee with which you’re dealing.  On an international level, it seems that the “rules” can change from minute to minute.  Or maybe, it’s just our interpretation of said rules. 

So, after freaking out about having to get a certificado do bagagem from the consulate in San Francisco, translate the inventory of our things into Portuguese (which I did) and all the other attendant forms, here’s what happened…

We were at the Arrábida shopping mall here in the Canidelo hood, about to buy a printer/copier so that we could print out and copy everything when, my phone rang.  It was Bongers calling to say that our shipment would be delivered next week on Tuesday or Wednesday.  I replied that I was working on getting the requisite forms but that it probably wouldn’t happen that fast.  (San Francisco Portuguese consulate, enough said!)  He said, that’s ok, never mind the forms, we can get it through customs for you for 124 Euros without any forms.  At first, I didn’t believe him.  It was a good thing that there was a place to sit down, so I did.  Really?!  …says I.  And then I thought, why ever didn’t you tell me that this was an option in the first place?!  I said, done. Where do I wire the money? 

It would have cost $200 to Fedex the forms to and from the consulate plus their fee so, 124 euros sounded like a screaming deal at this point.  Our man at Bongers said that he would let me know what day delivery would be by the end of the week.  I said, you are awesome and rang off.  Hal-le-freakin-lu-jah!  One bureaucratic bullet dodged.

I didn’t hear from Bongers and thought, well, they will let me know when our shipment is ready for delivery.  On Monday evening I was giving an English lesson online when the doorbell rang.  It was the movers.  They were outside with a truck load that contained our worldly goods!  It was a good thing that we were home!  I finished the lesson while Joe received the box parade.

Whoo hoo!  After nearly three months, I had forgotten what all we shipped.  I was glad to have summer clothes because it is supposed to be in the eighties here on Sunday.  Sadly, the only thing that was broken was Joe’s $400 office chair, the one thing he really needs, of course.  And naturally, the deductible on the moving insurance for breakage is $500.  Figures, ‘eh?

Our favorite Portuguese bubbly to celebrate having fully arrived in Portugal!

But, all in all we are happy to have our things and now feel like we have finally arrived.  I still say that if you are moving to another country, don’t ship anything.  It is not worth the brain damage nor the cost.  Thank you very little not so Transparent International and, thank you very much Bongers International!

Still Moving?!

So, we have been living in Portugal for two months now, and Raios!  (Damn!)  It is amazing.  I wish that I could convey how wonderful it is.  Daily, I am blown away by how fantastic the food and drink are not to mention the scenery and how helpful and friendly the people are. 

Slogging through the bureaucracy, however, continues.  The movers packed and picked up our things in Denver on February 11th and we are still waiting for our ship to come in, as it were.  The first estimate for arrival of our personal belongings was April 11th.  When we had not heard anything by the 15th I sent an email to Transparent International (which has been anything but transparent), asking if there was a new guestimate for an arrival date.  Finally, a few days later, I got an email from the company in the Netherlands that is handling the Euro portion of our moving program and was told that April 24th would be the new estimated date of arrival.

But I get ahead of myself.  Let me back up.  Around the time that we arrived in Porto I got an email from not so Transparent International informing me that our shipment was on a container and BYW, we owed them another $4,000!!!  (I had already paid them $5,000.)  Isto é uma merda do caraças!  Go ahead and look that up if you dare, it is a multi F-word phrase in Portuguese.  (Yes, my Portuguese is getting better by the day and more colorful to boot.  I still have a long way to go, needless to say!)  Oh, yeah you had a lot more stuff than we thought!  Mad as a hatter did not even begin to cover how pissed off I was/am.  My first thought was, you know what?  Keep it, I don’t even need any of that stuff.  Then, of course, I realized that it would become a legal nightmare that I would rather not entertain.  So, I emailed them and asked, what are my alternatives?  They said that they would check with the Euro movers and get back to me.  They knocked off about two hundred dollars.  So, now our 30 some odd boxes of personal items worth about $1,000 is costing us $9,000 to ship to Portugal. 

My only small consolation is in the misery loves company department.  After talking to other recent ex-pats to Portugal, it turns out that everyone we talked to went through the same thing!  WTF is all I have to say.  How can these mafioso movers get away with this?!  I will be Yelping the bejesus out of them once we do get our things.  Here is my advice to anyone moving overseas:  DO NOT SHIP ANYTHING!  Take only what you can check on the plane.  It is not worth the brain damage.  The estimates for moving our “act” overseas ranged from $3,000-5,000.  What did we say about everything costing twice as much and taking twice as long as you think?  Right.  Try three times!

Oh, and guess what?  There is a list of documents that we have to come up with before taking delivery of our goods if we want to avoid paying duty on everything.  Now, I had seen the certificado do bagagem mentioned early on in my research about moving to Portugal but lost the memo in the shuffle. It is one of the required documents and it must be issued by the Portuguese consulate in the states that issued your resident visa.  Flashback to San Francisco.  I emailed the consulate in SF asking what I needed to do to get the luggage certificate?  Well, they referred me to the site that spells it out.  Again, color me clueless!  Check it:

Required documents:

  • Signed and dated declaration (must be in Portuguese, see example below)
  • Add two photocopies of the declaration (so, the original plus two copies); (The copies do not need to be notarized BUT the original may have to be, check notes below);
  • Copy of valid Portuguese ID Card OR copy of valid Portuguese Passport (personal data page) OR EU country passport (personal data page) OR third country passport with residence visa (personal data page and residence visa page); (The copies do not need to be notarized);
  • Documental evidence of the dates of beginning and end of residency in the country (copy of bills, driver’s license,…);
  • Documental evidence showing the personal goods have been used for at least 6 months before the end of residency in the country;
  • Cover letter explaining the service you require and your contacts (email and cellphone number);
  • Self-addressed postmarked envelope;
  • Check payable to “Portuguese Consulate”.

IMPORTANT:

– Make sure you send all of the required documents. Incomplete applications will not be accepted and will be returned.

– It is necessary for the signature to be notarized if the declaration is made outside our jurisdiction (checked by the address on the return envelope).

– Person requesting this certificate must be a legal resident of Portugal, regardless of citizenship

It is almost as bad as the application for resident visa requirements.  I could just cry.  Can you say, frustrated to tears?  And there is a prize in it for anyone who can tell me what, “documental evidence showing the personal goods have been used for at least 6 months before the end of residency in the country,” might be.  (Like I saved all of the receipts for everything I ever purchased in the past 20 years!)

And, that’s not all!  There is a registration form that must be filled out by someone at the town hall here in Gaia saying that we are registered to live here, and proof of work contract, among other things that we already actually have.

Bongers International, the movers in the Netherlands (I swear, that is really their name!) now says that the container has arrived in Rotterdam and that the new guestimate for arrival in Porto is between May 5-11th.  Let’s hope it’s later since it took the Portuguese consulate in SF a week to reply to my email.  Once I assemble all the documents, translate our inventory into Portuguese and have it all notarized, I must Fedex it all to the consulate with a prepaid return envelope and a check for $50.03 for the cost of the certificate.  ($50.03, really?)  I can only hope that I can pull it all together and get the certificate back before our things arrive.  Boa sorte!  (Good luck) with that.  Now, if only we actually owned anything worth the $9k that we could sell to make up for our stupidity!  Experience is an expensive teacher, I guess!  Caraças, I say!

Vila Nova de Gaia

So, we now live in Canidelo, a neighborhood in Vila Nova de Gaia which is across the river from Porto where port wine is stored and aged. The views from either side to the other are fabulous!  We have been here almost five weeks and we have not yet cracked the surface of all there is to see in Gaia, much less Porto.  All I know for sure is that we really need to prioritize our travels because, we are way too old to see/do it all!  We could spend a year exploring different routes to the beach or the river from our apartment! 

We do have a few landmarks to keep us centered.  In the unfortunate department:  Mc Donald’s and Burger King are way too close, about a 20-minute walk away.  No escaping US influence anywhere in the world, I’m sorry to say. And these are probably two of the worst offerings from the states.

In the it’s a wacky world department, right near Mc Donald’s is a round about that has a 20-foot-tall strawberry in the middle of it.  Now, that’s a landmark!  Vila Nova de Gaia has an agricultural history and has an ear of corn and strawberries in its coat of arms.  And yes, they are delicious, the strawberries, that is!

Gaia is also well known for its beaches.  There is a 14-mile boardwalk that starts in Espinho a little north of Gaia and runs through Gaia along the beach.  The beaches are beautiful and there is a 17th century chapel towards the south end of the boardwalk.  The Chapel of Senhor da Pedra is practically in the ocean on the rocks. During high tide it is in the water!

4 Caminhos Brazilian Steakhouse. Yum!
Senhor de Pedra Chapel

Bairra is a tiny hole in the wall owned by a local celebrity chef, Pedro Sanchez.  The tables are set with champagne glasses and Pedro suggests a glass of the local sparkling wine to start.  You don’t have to ask me twice!  It was as good as any champagne.  We never saw a menu, we just took his suggestions and said, bring us whatever you think we’d like.  This is my kind of place!  The bread, cheeses and sausage were outstanding and the roast pork we had for an entrée was one of the best dishes to be had anywhere.  It paired perfectly with the local white blend wine that he suggested for us.  The chocolate pot de crème dessert was choco bliss.  Everything was made in house and with dessert we had a local cinnamon honey whiskey (also made in house) that was dangerously delicious at 100 proof.  But wait, there’s more!  Then our gracious host poured us some of his 30-year-old tawny port.  Holy mother of wow!  Nectar of the Gods, I tell you!  Oh, and Bairra is an eight-minute walk from our place.  Pretty much everything you could possibly need is within easy walking distance.  Yes, I think we have chosen wisely!